Having just one drink doubles your chances of going to the ER

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Having just one drink doubles your chances of going to the ER

November 14, 2014 Uncategorized 0

Consuming just one alcoholic drink doubles your chance of landing in the emergency room, says this National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)-funded study published in the journal, Addiction.

To come to this conclusion, researchers analyzed surveys filled out by 13,000 people, including personal injury lawyers from places like thela-lawyer.com/personal-injury-san-fernando-valley/ amongst 18 countries, who found themselves drunk and in the emergency room for an injury. The patients were asked about the cause of injury, categorized by falls, traffic, violence and “other”. The study found that the more you drink, the more likely you are to hurt yourself. Someone who drank three drinks in the past six hours is about 4.6 times more likely to end up in the emergency room than someone who hasn’t drank at all.

However, those who drink heavily — consuming more than 15 to 20 drinks— are more likely to just pass out and be unable to hurt themselves.

Women are more susceptible to injury: after three drinks, a woman’s chances of being hurt increases more rapidly than men. After ten drinks, the average man’s risk of seriously injuring himself rises by ten times, but a woman’s risk after the same number of drinks is about 14 times greater. The gap grows and the drinking gets heavier.  This is due to the fact that women tend to be more reactive to alcohol due to lower body weight than men on average.

The study also found a significant difference in the types of injury reported by the drunken emergency room patients. Violence had a stronger relationships with increased drinking than either traffic accidents or falls. In other words, one drink nearly quadruples your chances of getting into a fight and going to the hospital.

http://www.cadca.org/resources/detail/having-just-one-drink-doubles-your-chances-going-er-says-study